07 March 2010

cancer blog

The first page of Our Cancer Year is unusual. There is no dialog. The one man in the drawing looks disappointed. He is carrying bricks and his thinking cloud contains a dark cloud and lightning. Joyce’s brother Tod comes by her home. He hasn’t been in contact with her. Tod doesn’t have a job so Joyce’s husband Harvey offers Tod a lifting job after his surgery. Days later Harvey checks into the hospital for his surgery with Dr. Cantor. Hours after surgery, Dr. Cantor reveals to Joyce that he found a tumor in Harvey. He doesn’t explain to Joyce if “tumor mean the same as cancer”. Dr. Cantor doesn’t explain to Harvey about his condition. And the idea of being left by the doctor without an explanation makes Joyce furious. And again Dr. Cantor “leaves abruptly”. Harvey and Joyce look for comfort in their own way. Joyce finds comfort through a cancer hotline and Harvey finds his through will arrangements. Harvey’s CAT scan results are positive. “The cancer was encapsulated”. Harvey while on sick leave “decides to keep on moving, to keep busy”. During the process of moving, Harvey has a breakdown about his illness. He becomes violent and he throws bricks. At the moment of his breakdown the landlord unexpectedly comes to inspect the house. He doesn’t due to his respect for Harvey’s and Joyce’s privacy. At the new house, Joyce meets a female carpenter. They have a connection because the carpenter has a family history of cancer. The end of Our Cancer year appears sarcastically. The carpenter and Joyce portray an attitude that they don’t care about cancer because it can’t be stopped.
The comic made me have a personal reaction to it. I felt angry at the doctor because he showed that he didn’t care for Harvey and Joyce’s concerns. The pictures were very poorly drawn, I thought Joyce was a man. I think that people could get a moral meaning out o f this comic.

2 comments:

  1. Yeah...so wrong reading there, honeybun. On the bright side, you're ahead of the game if I assign a blog on this reading! On the downside, though, you still need to blog on the right text ;-)

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  2. Also, you need to more fully explain your responses. Why do you think the art is bad?

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