30 June 2010

twelve revolutions

` In reading Superman From Cleveland to Krypton by Micheal Chaben, it broke down the history of superman and his origin in the history of comics itself. The creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster along with many other comic book artists of that time all were Jewish. It spoke of the relations of Superman and the Jewish history and its significance to many other readers, and including many other comics having Jewish morals.

I found this reading to be; personally, kind of irritating. Only because I am not religious, although I don’t disagree that religion, along with other values impose morals on society. Naturally we choose our own influences as individuals, and I don’t disagree that you can easily see how such ideas are relatable, but that applies to anything that is a potential influence. I am not a big fan of Superman comics but yes they are entertaining. I enjoy how he sited many sources that proved his argument but I am strongly opposed to the only direction he narrowed it down to was the Jewish origins, but I would just say that they do have many Jewish influences.

Up Up and Oy Ve

` In reading Superman From Cleveland to Krypton by Micheal Chaben, it broke down the history of superman and his origin in the history of comics itself. The creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster along with many other comic book artists of that time all were Jewish. It spoke of the relations of Superman and the Jewish history and its significance to many other readers, and including many other comics having Jewish morals.

I found this reading to be; personally, kind of irritating. Only because I am not religious, although I don’t disagree that religion, along with other values impose morals on society. Naturally we choose our own influences as individuals, and I don’t disagree that you can easily see how such ideas are relatable, but that applies to anything that is a potential influence. I am not a big fan of Superman comics but yes they are entertaining. I enjoy how he sited many sources that proved his argument but I am strongly opposed to the only direction he narrowed it down to was the Jewish origins, but I would just say that they do have many Jewish influences.

big world

In reading Reinventing Comics, by Scott McCloud I came to understand why he argued that comics need diversity to stay alive. McCloud explains his opinion, and breaks down this diversity into twelve revolutions and in three of them there is a central theme. He further explains why we need this diversity only so that way comics can remain consistent.

I believe comics need as much diversity as the artists who create them. If you wish to attract a larger range of readers you need to create a variety of genres to reach out to a larger population. Comics are already so diverse because there are so many interpretations, but if you narrow it down to just one then the concept will just get too boring. I don’t think comics will get old not for me anyway. What I do think will be and advance for them would be to get more comics from other countries such as Canada, France, and Japan. Even though they don’t have a large variety they do have more independent reading material.

29 June 2010

lois lane sees the cape

To begin, a brief overview was provided from De Haven's novel,It's Superman!,consisting of young Clark Kent's life before he put on the tights.It describes an adventurous road trip he shared with a friend where he encountered many life issues during the 1930's; rampant racism, the recovery of the Great Depression, war in Europe. He also encountered situations to save people which results in him failing and plays a role in his doubt of his own abilities. Haven's introduction of Lois Lane and Clark Kent's beginning begins with Lois Lane witnessing a man being shot in the chest. She rushes to the mans side and puts herself in danger a the killer who is now behind the wheel of a car aimed and rushing at her. Instead of death, she witnesses the car being held at a complete stop and then being destroyed right in front of her eyes. The story continues into Clark Kent's events where it describes a emotional human side to this superhero. He expresses that he doesn't know what to do to defeat this robot monster killing people in his community but after being humbled by his mother's voice he scraps his courage together and defeats the monster which also brings him face to face with Lois Lane. Haven also provides a quick look at the man behind the robotic monster, Lex Luther. The image given of Lex Luther is of a man that is controlled, scary and vividly complex through a simple drive through the city as he plots his hideous plan that includes people ranging from the president to George Washington Carver. But Lex's thick egocentric mind leaves a calling card to be found, serial numbers in all of the 100 free robotic monsters, which makes the bridge between Clark Kent/Superman and Lex.

I would like to say first off, that i read through this assigned reading so quickly that I was extremely disappointed when it was over. I really liked how Haven made his jumps between the characters. From Lois' insanely descriptive mind, to Lex's over inflated cocky mind to Clark's honorable but fragile mind. I also appreciated the brief introduction which helped me as the reader to understand his frail thought processing. I am now looking for the novel so I can read the entire thing!!! =0)


Clark Kent's first encounter of Lois Lane is during his battle with Lex Luther's robotic monsters that causes mayhem. Lois Lane witnesses

New Reading for Tomorrow!

Hey Class,

The reading for tomorrow is marked in the syllabus as an excerpt from Batman: Arkham Asylum, but I'm changing it to an excerpt from Tom De Haven's It's Superman! The reading can be found on E-Reserves as "Lois Sees the Capeman," which is the title of the chapter. Since the section you'll be reading comes near the end of the novel, I've provided a short summary of the book so far here. This should put the reading in better context than just reading it cold.

Also included with that summary is one for Alan Moore's Watchmen reading you'll be blogging on over the weekend. So keep that in mind before you do your weekend reading.

See you all in class tomorrow!

28 June 2010

Pioneers

Superman made his first appearance in 1938 in Action Comics No. 1 where we are introduced to his origin. As an aging planet a scientist places his infant son in a space-ship and send it to Earth. Once found on Earth the alien infant is placed and raised in an orphange where as he grows his super abilities become apparent to all those around him and as he matures further he learns and channels the full potential to his abilities and he becomes, "Superman! Champion of the oppressed , the physical marvel who had sworn to devote his existence to helping those in need!" Superman isn't always hovering over the city looking for evil-doers though, during the day he uses a secret identity, Clark Kent, a reporter and average citizen working for The Daily Earth.

We are introduced to Batman first in Detective Comics #27 in 1939. Batman, like Superman, hides his identity by being a normal civilian during the day, and at night fighting crime, Batman's identity is Bruce Wayne, a multi-millionaire entrepreneur, a ladie's man and an original gangster in my opinion because he's so cool. The difference between Batman and every other super hero is that Batman doesn't have freakish super abilities, no super strength, no super speed, this guy can't even fly, he defeats evil-doers by using his highly advanced weapons, tools and gadgets, intelligence, and also his crazy skills in beating down crooks on the spot.

I've never been into Superman and reading his first issue didn't alter that at all. I'm not very impressed by Superman as a comic, I enjoy Batman more based on the fact that he isn't super human and he has to actually work to fight crime by using his mind, skills and precision not by the ability to have bullets bounce off his skin. Superman can fly and pick up my house but i'm more impressed by the vigilanty who really puts his life on the line in the name of justice.

the 12 revolutions

McCloud’s enthusiasm for comic book making is apparent in, The Twelve Revolutions. He enlightens the readers on how he does his work and why he does his in keeping comics alive. He informs the readers of how important the roles that the 12 revolutions play in the making of comics. He explains the massive popularity that comic books had in the years 84’ to 94’, but he goes further to explain how the decline of that popularity died off leaving many comic retail store to close down. McCloud expresses that if creators used his 12 revolutions while writing their story lines, it come spark a comeback success within the comic book community.
I feel that McCloud has enough knowledge and experience to articulate his feelings towards other writers as well as enough excitement that can benefit the readers. I really enjoyed his artist creativity that he used within this chapter, especially him with a ripped mid-section and enormous biceps’. =0) LOL