10 February 2011

Sequencial Comic Analysis

            Chapter six in Scott McCloud’s book Understanding Comics: the Invisible Art basically tells how the use of words and text together help impact the telling of a story. In other words, there’s the use of both words and pictures or images in every single area of subjects such as art and lecture. McCloud then details the stages of how we read throughout our lives. Starting with children, and how every page is mostly pictures and a low amount of words because it’s “easier”.  Then as we grow older we begin to separate each subject, to just art, or just literature, with each being a lot more complex of course.
            McCloud then tells us that about 15,000 years ago, human communication began to take its course. He describes the fact that these ancient cave paintings were more symbolic than anything else. It carried on through to the Egyptian lifestyle and also that of the Mayans. Although when the printing process was introduced, there were more expectations of words. Then further and further on through the decades, the separation grows more and more. McCloud tells how in the 19th century the two of these subjects started to come together in what today we call “comics.” He then goes on to detail how much art and literature impacts the quality of the comic. The two may combine harmoniously.
            In my opinion comics are a great way to get information. It helps both types of people, those who learn better through words and speaking, and those that favor the pictures and examples to learn. As for me, I am the latter, so words with pictures help with the retaining of info, and I do like to read comics. Scott McCloud’s detailing really impresses me because it shows how deep a comic actually is.

2 comments:

  1. Good statment and use of text from the book. I also thought your position statment was thought out with the way we learn to exspress the relationship between the two.

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  2. beef, which statement/text are you referring to?

    This is some excellent writing, Pierce. Keep it up!

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