13 February 2012

Chapter 7, An Ongoing Cycle of Creativity


In this chapter Scott McCloud makes the long awaited rebuttal to the argument that comic books are in fact art, only if your definition of art is as broad as his. McCloud's first powerful example is of the basic pursuit of humanity: Survival and Procreation. McCloud says that What we choose to do as humans in predicaments such as survival at the workplace or in the vast lands of Pangaea express our individualism, therefore obliviously creating living art. Even when we are not occupied with problems or responsibilities, we can create art. The example McCloud uses to show how a primitive being conjures such entertainment was a scene he set up where “...a man beats as simple rhythm with a pair of stones. He doesn't know why, but the sound pleases him” This action may have no monetary benefit, but it pleases the soul and sometimes that's all that matters.
Scott goes on to say that the true artist does not pursue art for its luxuries like fame, fortune, and fornication but solely for the Art. Scott McCloud simplifies this ongoing phenomenon by making the simplified statement "My art has no practical value whatsoever! But it's important!" For a lot of artists this remark is true, because they are pursuing an art form but have no concern for the financial support of major label offers. Scott McCloud eventually summons the idea of a six step process in which we as humans create art, more importantly ideas.

I have no dispute with the way Scott organizes the thought process in which art is created and believed that his Apple analogy is very applicable, but his implication on how new art is a cycle of old art struck me as a little forward. There are some artists out now who are innovators in genres unexplored but I do understand that most artists share common ideas and goals for success. importantly ideas.
There are some artists out now who are innovators in genres unexplored but I do understand that most artists share common ideas and goals for success. Here is a good example of an artist pursuing a relatively new idiom of electronic music, but is not in the pursuit of quick fame and abundance.
He may be building on the ideas of Electronic Dance Music and Hip Hop rotted tunes, but he is creating a genre of music all his own.
(sorry for the link, it was not uploading the video)


Scott McCloud makes the very true observation about how art is unavoidable and an outlet for expression by proclaiming the fact that "Because of its independence from our evolution bread instincts art is the way we assert our identities as individuals and break out in their own roles nature cast is in."
This statement is very true, everyone has something to express in my own personal opinion. Scott McCloud also has a very optimistic and eclectic view on comic books saying “but to proclaim, as so many so often do, that that's not art presumes that art is an either/or proposition. I do not think this." I share the same optimism with McCloud, believing that almost anything can be art. I know this idea focuses more on the main idea of Chapter six, but I wanted to shine some light on the subject. People do critique art based on qualities pertaining mostly to early exposure of art, but to call some items and pieces "not art" is a little harsh. A good example is the album work from beat producer Flying Lotus. All of his album covers have been labeled abstract and have been off-putting to some, though I do not see why.
The real interesting part of this chapter is when McCloud introduces the six steps that a human experiences before creating new art. The six steps include ideas, purpose, form, idiom, structure, craft, and surface. I have no dispute with the way Scott organizes the thought process in which art is created and believed that his Apple analogy is very applicable, but his implication on how new art is a cycle of old art struck me as a little forward.
Another idea Scott McCloud asserts is the psychological process of the development of ideas, form, idiom, and structure before pen touches paper. Scott McCloud goes on to give us an in-depth view of the level of success artists can obtain and the fluctuation of self-worth that applies to each artist individually. In other words some artists are content with progressively successful lives, but some have a hunger for identity that can only be satiated with new innovation, such as a new idiom for comment books. Scott McCloud suggests that we choose art based on its surface like an apple and then slowly bite away to its true form core or idea. This is also true, and it helps continue the everlasting cycle of idea creation that we all go through on a daily basis. Continue the cycle today and create something new, or at least find a common subject matter and present it in a new form

4 comments:

  1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kQMDSw3Aqo

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  2. Marylin Manson does have New Sh...Ideas

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  3. Nice post, Rob; but you're still referring to McCloud by his first name ;-)

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