12 March 2014

Response To Persepolis Excerpt

Persepolis is the story of a woman by the name of Marjane Satrapi, giving her perception of growing up through an oppressed war torn country, Iran, in the 1970's. The story starts with Marjane, age 10, being forced into change, obligated to wear a veil as well as being separated from male students (bilingual schools were closed down), due to the fact Iran was going through a cultural revolution; "The Islamic Revolution". At the age of six Marjane was set on becoming a prophet, wanting to be "Justice, Love, And The Wrath Of God All In One." (Persepolis, 9) having daily discussions with "God"; telling teachers, as well as her grandmother what her profession would be. After being exposed to the uproar of civil disagreement in Iran for a set amount of time Marjane stated "The Year Of The Revolution I Had To Take Action. So I Put My Prophetic Destiny Aside For A While" (Persepolis, 10) and focused her attention on being part of the revolution. Learning that the government had take action on the revolt by citizens (Police burning down The Rex Cinema) from her parents she wanted to take action also, at this point "God" left her side. After leaving Iran Marjane goes to Australia with her mothers best friend, ZoZo. Her daughter Shirin was more modernized where she was into scented & colored lipstick and earmuffs, causing Marjane to say "What A Traitor! While People Were Dying In Our Country, She Was Talking To Me About Trivial Things." (Persepolis, 156). ZoZo eventually sent Marjane to a Nun boarding school, where she was somewhat of an outcast for a period of time. After meeting her group whom consisted of "An eccentric, a punk, two orphans, and a third-worlder" (Persepolis, 167) she befriends Julie and eventually gets expelled from the school and goes to live with Julie. Before her expulsion Marjane states "To educate myself, I had to understand myself, I had to understand everything. Starting with myself, me, Marjane, the woman." (Persepolis, 175).

From this excerpt I see Marjane as a believable character due to the fact it sounds like a real person being torn between culture, family, personal life, and issues (In this case war). It is unique that Satrapi choose to tell this story in this way; having a female play the main character first and foremost because there aren't many comics derived from a female point of view showing forms of how a female feels (attitude, reason, and trying to be male-like; trying to urinate standing up), this in itself shows shows micro-aggression towards females; giving a form of stereotype to women. Additionally Satrapi gives an insight to the reader on how a child can constantly be affected by environment, society, and their own personal experiences; Marjane puts down her Prophetic Destiny to focus on her environment (war) and that mentality follows her years later where she feels as if Shirin is a traitor for talking about lipstick and earmuffs. Then prior to her expulsion Marjane states "To educate myself, I had to understand myself, I had to understand everything. Starting with myself, me, Marjane, the woman." (Persepolis, 175) again showing how she switches her attention to now not war or environment but her own self understanding. This gives a form of realism to the character which the reader can connect to on some basis.


- This image reflects the affect society can have on one; the mixture of a woman first and foremost smoking, gun shells wrapped over head and shoulders, cigarette packet logo, and blood stains and wraps shows strength, struggle, and a form of nonchalant. There is also the elements of the rose which signifies delicate, purity, and simplicity and her eyes which signifies pain, yet a bit of deceit.
-It reminds me of Marjane because based of the excerpts, she is warped in more ways than she ever thought she could be just through her life events.

1 comment:

  1. Great post, Jay! I'd like to know a little more about how Satrapi telling her story (from a feminine perspective) "shows micro-aggression towards females; giving a form of stereotype to women."

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